Author Olivia Boler

writing is fun
October 31st, 2013 by Olivia Boler

It’s Nano Time!

Yesterday was kind of a landmark in the world of me. I finished a draft of my latest novel that seemed good enough to show someone other than my imaginary friend who follows me around all day. (Her opinion is one I don’t really trust—sometimes she’s like a hype man, other times…) Anyway, this is, I’d say, the fourth draft of this book I’ve been tinkering with on and off—mostly off—for ten years. It’s about two sisters who run a tearoom and their ups and downs in the romance department. I sent it off to my friend whose judgment I actually do trust—always important to have one of those.

Now I’m kind of dangling here. What should I do next? Well, it just so happens that tomorrow is the start of Nanowrimo. Honestly, I thought I’d miss it this year, that I would still be caught in the happy cloud of Nora and Rainey, the protagonists of the tearoom novel. So, I’m a tad thrown off to be at loose ends. There are plenty of them hanging about just begging to be tied up—like that prequel to The Flower Bowl Spell I’ve talked about. I do believe it’s time to give that a dusting off, just in time for November’s 50,000-word goal. Who’s with me? My Nano handle is livyink. Hope to see you there!

Oh, and have a happy and safe Halloween—and by safe, I mean, don’t pig out on too much candy. It’ll cause a rash.

 

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October 17th, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Coziness and Discord in the Haddonverse

The Red HouseThe Red House by Mark Haddon

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I just finished reading The Red House by Mark Haddon, known for his bestseller The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time. I picked up his most recent novel at the library, sold on it by the opening paragraph:

“Cooling towers and sewage farms. Finstock, Charlbury, Ascott-under-Wychwood. Seventy miles per house, the train unzips the fields. Two gun-gray lines beside the river’s meander. Flashes of sun on the hammered metal. Something of steam about it, even now. Hogwarts and Adlestrop. The night mail crossing the border, Cheyenne sweeping down from the ridge. Delta blues from the boxcar. Somewhere, those secret points that might just switch and send you curving into a world of uniformed porters and great-aunts and summers at the lake.”

Really, it was that phrase: the train unzips the fields…Absolutely lovely and evocative and true. I’ve been on that train, seen that very thing from the window, that journey through the unknown. That line was the ticket that opened up this world. That’s what good writing should do.

The story, told from multiple points of view, often reads like poetry. Sometimes you don’t know whose thoughts you’re in…and it doesn’t really matter. The atmosphere of an English family holiday has surprising elements of coziness, even among the family discord and each individuals’ personal dramas. A reader can happily get lost in Haddon’s universe for a while.

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September 27th, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Playing Hooky

I’ve been working almost non-stop on freelance gigs for the past few weeks. That and the usual mom thing have taken up a lot of time. Oh, and rediscovering classic Buffy the Vampire Slayer episodes thanks to my “accidentally” signing up for Amazon Prime. So great!
Yesterday, I got done a little early with my work, so I opened up the Scrivener file of my latest novel manuscript. I’ve been sneaking in a few minutes on it here and there. Not more than a half-hour, I’m sad to say. But it’s been enough to keep me going. I’m near the end of a first very loose revision. So today, a little burned out by work, and about to start a new client project, I decided to open my novel doc again. And this time, a half-hour went by. Then another. And another. And another! I stopped to run an errand. I came back, and it was still open on my computer desktop. I thought I’d close it out, but one more thought occurred to me. I kept going…And now, it’s almost time to fetch the kids from school.
Productive? Yes. (Although I’m trying not to think about playing catch up on work this weekend.)
Profitable? Time will tell.

August 22nd, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Thanks for showing up, Bernadette

Where'd You Go, BernadetteWhere’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This novel had everything I look for in a book—smart, likable, flawed characters; an engaging plot; ideas to convey that are more than just “he likes me, she hates me, the world sucks”; fantastic writing; and a little something extra that keeps you turning pages. What’s it called? That ineffable IT. I got the chuckles—had to explain myself to my husband when I woke him up at night and to friends at Birch Lake where we hung out last week. Laughing out loud—always a good thing.

A bonus was Semple’s The New Yorker  “Shouts & Murmurs” piece included at the end of the book. It’s about a PC preschool teacher trying to set up a Day of the Dead altar…Let’s just say, if you don’t  have young children or you do have a certain earnestness, perhaps you won’t think it as hilarious as I do…Oh heck, give it a try.

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July 27th, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Pagford—Oh, the Drama!

The Casual VacancyThe Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

As I read the first few chapters of this novel, it occurred to me that I probably would not have chosen to read it on my own, had it not been for my overriding need to know how Rowling’s writing and imagination fare outside of Hogwarts. The characters of the small English parish town of Pagford are pretty stereotyped and they are hard to like—usually an important criterion for me. But I was curious–as many a fan of the Harry Potter series is–about how Rowling would do in a world grounded in realism—and trust me, it is a harsh, cold, ugly, brutal realism. (I happened to be simultaneously rereading Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets with my daughter, so it’s been fun to see the way Rowling’s themes run through her works, and how she paints flawed, very human characters—Harry, just tell Dumbledore you’re hearing voices! Suhkvinder, just tell your mom you’re being tormented by the high school psycho!)
Had The Casual Vacancy been her only book, Rowling would likely still be teaching for a living, but not because the book isn’t any good. It’s very good, but it’s also hard to read. Pagford is populated by anti-heroes—my favorite is Howard Mollison, the obese, self-satisfied member of the parish council, the enemy of the poor and disenfranchised, who’s also charming and funny. It’s the kind of book you read in an English class or because you want to learn how to write literary fiction like a billionaire novelist (just kidding).
In the end, I’m glad I stuck it out. Again, my curiosity got the best of me, and about halfway through I found myself reluctantly looking forward to reading the next chapter, and the next. Kind of the way you look forward to getting some exercise at lunchtime or brushing your teeth when you’re so exhausted—you don’t really want to, but you have to because it’s good for you, and you know it. This is a Book of Ideas with a Message and Thought-provoking Issues: teenage cyber-bullying, self-mutilation/cutting, small town politics, child abuse, drug abuse, societal pariahs, bigotry, racism, classism, and redemption—yes, even redemption! If it makes you more compassionate or at least yearn to be so, then Rowling has done her job. So…take a deep breath, read it, then treat yourself to something frothy and pink—in liquid or book form, either will do.

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July 17th, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Yes, I’m Still Here

Hard to believe it’s been over two months since I’ve posted. Trust me, my intentions have been to give some updates, but I seem to have forgotten how to write anything witty or interesting. Hang on…It’s coming back…I need brain yoga for creative flow!

There isn’t much on the book front, nothing really concrete that I’m ready to share, anyway. I’ll just be cagey and say I hope to have some good news soon…The Flower Bowl Spell got a really nice review from ForeWord Reviews online. Click here if you want to read it. Yes, I do write reviews for them too; however, we are all freelancers and I don’t personally know any of their other reviewers. Actually, this is what happened: I’d entered their Book of the Year Awards 2012 contest, but got disqualified since I write reviews (Should have figured that out, right?). They offered to do an online review instead. A total no brainer. I got some feedback from a few people who have read the review via Goodreads or on my blog, saying they would check out my book. Huzzah!

On the personal front, I went to my college reunion in May, and took my daughter with me. It was our first trip with just the two of us, and we had a lot of fun. We also visited friends and relatives on the East Coast so that was a bonus. In June, my family and I went to Hong Kong to visit more relatives and see the places my mother used to frequent in her formative years. Sweltering, muggy heat, but what are you gonna do?

 

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A conversation started at the American Girl Bistro outside Boston
(my daughter’s response: “Why would I tell you that?”)
HK skyline
The Hong Kong skyline
star ferryThe Star Ferry in Hong Kong

Summertime ushers my kids into camp and other fun activities. It also means some of my freelance gigs slow down, so I’ve spent more time getting some rough drafts into shape. Scrivener software has been more useful than I ever imagined. The tutorial was really helpful—I don’t think I could have just plunged in and started using it without going over that—but that’s just me.

I hope all of you are having a marvelous summer. And I promise not to let two months go by without any news. Pinky promise.

 

May 3rd, 2013 by Olivia Boler

ForeWord Reviews & Me

I’ve been writing reviews for ForeWord Reviews magazine for about 100 years, ever since they were kind enough to write a nice review of my first novel, Year of the Smoke Girl. I’ve since moved on to writing for their offshoot, Clarion, and have become a de facto poetry reviewer. I’ve always admired poetry, have lots of friends who are poets, but am myself not a master (or mistress) of the genre.

This week, the Executive Editor of ForeWord Reviews, Howard Lovy, featured me in his weekly newsletter. To see it click here.

 

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Yay, fun! And Happy May.

 

April 3rd, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Above the Belt

Someone was snarky to me on Twitter recently. She was one of my “followers,” and I followed her as well—blindly, because, unless it’s porn-related, I will follow pretty much anyone. This explains my sudden popularity with Korean-language Tweeters.

I admit that I don’t have the thickest skin and I can be snarky, too. Not the greatest combo on the psyche. But I try to reel in the snark when it comes to those who aren’t in a place of power. Politicians, celebrities, the wealthy—I think they are kind of fair game. But me—I’m none of those things, so by my own rules, I should be left alone.

At the same time, I’m putting myself out there because I’m trying to be a successful author, to place my books into the hands of as many readers as possible via social media (it’s like a cheap, easy date). I know I’ve made myself vulnerable to some lunatics and just garden-variety grouches because of this, but that doesn’t mean I have to play along or engage in a flame war.

So, please (the magic word!), let’s try to keep things civil. Let’s be mature. And if you don’t have anything nice or constructive to tweet, don’t tweet anything at all.

Thanks to SweetClipArt.com for the image. Peace!

 Image courtesy of sweetclipart.com. Peace!

March 25th, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Fun at the Fest

Thank you to all who came out to support the Noe Valley Authors Festival this past Saturday. I don’t have any stats, but St. Philip Parish Hall was crowded the entire afternoon. A special shout out to my Aunt Deetje and friend Hannah for coming out, and for buying books from local authors!

I sold a few books and did a book swap. I also raffled off a copy of my first novel Year of the Smoke Girl. My kids attended and, much to my surprise, sat quietly at my feet. OK, I admit, they were watching The Incredibles on the iPad. But it was in Mandarin! When they got squirrelly, my husband Paul ran them around. And he hung out the entire time too, chatting with authors and purchasing books.

 

Olivia Boler and Laura McHale Holland at the Noe Valley Authors Festival, 3/23/13
Me & Laura being bookish

I lucked out and got a spot next to my old Noe Valley Voice friend, Laura McHale Holland. She has two books, her childhood memoir Reversible Skirt and her flash fiction collection, The Ice Cream Vendor’s Song. Check them both out—you won’t be disappointed.

All in all, it was a great success. I was so pleased to see the huge number of local San Francisco authors, especially those publishing independently, and the great turnout of readers and fans. The energy in the room was fantastic. Let’s just say, I’m inspired.

March 3rd, 2013 by Olivia Boler

Pour the House Wine

It’s so great to be in March. February was definitely a marathon, a brutal marathon. Maybe more like an ultra-marathon with endless days spent running for 26 to 40 miles with a pack of work and obligations on my back.

But March! March is a walk in the park. March is a leisurely hike. A stroll. Welcome, March.

And by the way, March 23, if you happen to be in San Francisco, I’ll be at the Noe Valley Authors Festival part of Word Week. Yes, I’ll have books for sale and I’ll be giving away candy and The Flower Bowl Spell bookmarks. If you buy my book at the Festival you’ll be entered in a raffle for a cool prize, TBD. The Noe Valley Authors Festival takes place at St. Philip the Apostle Church Hall at 725 Diamond Street, San Francisco, and goes from 2 to 5 p.m.

BTW, one awesome thing about February: I got to see my very good friend Siobhan Fallon, who was in town for a dramatic performance at Z Space Word for Word of two of the stories from her award-winning collection, You Know When the Men Are Gone. She also invited her good friend, middle grade author Anne Ylvisaker (Dear Papa, The Luck of the Buttons). Anne and I hit it off, which is great because it really is hard to find friends among writers, I don’t know why. (Insert snide joke about social awkwardness, backstabbing bastards, etc.)

Anne, Siobhan & Me at Z Space Word for Word
Anne, Siobhan, & Me at Z Space Word for Word

 

After the amazing and moving performance, Q & A with the directors and author, and book signing, we three ladies headed back to Siobhan’s sweet Union Square hotel. We got drinks at the Redwood Room in the Clift Hotel, which was an interesting experience since it was packed to the gills with party people. The photo portraits on the walls lent the place a Haunted Mansion for Grown-ups feel. The three of us, writers with kids who are often cooped up alone with our work, had a ball, staying up late talking shop and life over glasses of wine.

I highly recommend nights like these.

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